USDA Changes Disease Status of the Brazilian State of Santa Catarina with Regard to Certain Ruminant and Swine Diseases

The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is amending its regulations governing the importation of certain animals and animal products by adding the Brazilian State of Santa Catarina to the list of regions we recognize as free of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), rinderpest, swine vesicular disease (SVD), classical swine fever (CSF) and African swine fever (ASF). APHIS is also adding Santa Catarina to the list of regions that are subject to certain import restrictions on meat and meat products because of their proximity to or trading relationships with rinderpest- or FMD-affected countries.

These actions will update the disease status of Santa Catarina with regard to FMD, rinderpest, SVD, CSF and ASF while continuing to protect the United States from an introduction of those diseases by providing additional requirements for live swine, pork meat, pork products, live ruminants, ruminant meat and ruminant products imported into the United States from Santa Catarina.

Rinderpest, FMD, SVD, ASF and CSF are contagious, viral animal diseases. With the exception of FMD, these diseases are not transmissible from animals to humans and do not affect human health. Transmission of FMD to humans is rare. APHIS has a strong system in place for detecting and responding to outbreaks of foreign animal diseases and places trade restrictions on affected regions to protect against the introduction of diseases of concern. All imported products must follow USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) regulations for food safety and labeling. Currently, FSIS does not allow the importation of meat processed in Brazil.

Notice of this final rule is scheduled for publication in the Nov. 16 Federal Register and becomes effective Dec. 1.

Source: USDA